Ethical Challenges in Health Policy

Presenter Information

Ted Callis, Providence College

Location

Harkins 300, Providence College

Event Website

http://www.providence.edu/hpm/Pages/Conference.aspx

Start Date

31-3-2012 2:30 PM

End Date

31-3-2012 4:00 PM

Description

The fear of death and illness is a powerful motivator. When taking into account the ethical reasoning that drives organ transplantation and procurement practices, it is persuasive enough to sway minds and corrupt pure reason. And so this paper will uncover how fear of illness and death shape answers to the ethical questions that arise in transplant debates and how these debates are in turn raised in the ethical dilemmas portrayed by popular American films. This paper will examine recent films such as The Island, and Never Let Me Go to illustrate how the ethical dilemmas associated with organ transplantation, and the fear engendered by these depictions of it express the ethical debates of the American culture. It will determine that the shortage of available organs lies at the root of this fear, and then analyze how it inspires two general views of transplantation debates. It creates a fear that motivates the organ recipient and a fear which motivates the potential organ donor.

 
Mar 31st, 2:30 PM Mar 31st, 4:00 PM

Sorry Buddy, But Your Name Isn't on the List: Fear and the Ethics of Organ Donation in Film

Harkins 300, Providence College

The fear of death and illness is a powerful motivator. When taking into account the ethical reasoning that drives organ transplantation and procurement practices, it is persuasive enough to sway minds and corrupt pure reason. And so this paper will uncover how fear of illness and death shape answers to the ethical questions that arise in transplant debates and how these debates are in turn raised in the ethical dilemmas portrayed by popular American films. This paper will examine recent films such as The Island, and Never Let Me Go to illustrate how the ethical dilemmas associated with organ transplantation, and the fear engendered by these depictions of it express the ethical debates of the American culture. It will determine that the shortage of available organs lies at the root of this fear, and then analyze how it inspires two general views of transplantation debates. It creates a fear that motivates the organ recipient and a fear which motivates the potential organ donor.

http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/auchs/2012/panelc1/3