The Power of Prevention

Location

Harkins 301, Providence College

Event Website

http://www.providence.edu/hpm/Pages/Conference.aspx

Start Date

31-3-2012 2:30 PM

End Date

31-3-2012 4:00 PM

Description

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the ways in which new advances in the production of a vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) have been received by both the general public and the medical community. Despite its high prevalence in the general population, as a sexually transmitted infection, there is a great deal of shame and stigma associated with contracting the virus (Waller, et. al. 2007). HPV is a disease of disparities in that ethnic and sexual minorities are disproportionately affected. Since the HPV vaccine is most effective at both a younger age, and before the first sexual experience, it is important to protect the future sexual health of individuals. The debate is still ongoing in many states about whether the HPV vaccine should be a part of required school vaccinations for those entering the sixth grade. Many moral conservatives fear that forced vaccination infringes on parental rights and encourages sexual promiscuity before marriage. Abstinence-only messages being taught in schools has only served to amplify a sex-negative ideology in American culture. It is important for health care professionals to be aware of the social perspective of HPV and address these concerns, especially with their at risk patients. By addressing disparities, parent and provider views of vaccination, and sexual stigmas, vaccine uptake in all adolescents will be improved. Implementing a vaccine mandate for school entry will ensure that those at most risk of being affected will be reached.

 
Mar 31st, 2:30 PM Mar 31st, 4:00 PM

Human Papillomavirus: How Social Ideologies Influence Medical Policy and Care

Harkins 301, Providence College

The purpose of this paper is to discuss the ways in which new advances in the production of a vaccine against human papillomavirus (HPV) have been received by both the general public and the medical community. Despite its high prevalence in the general population, as a sexually transmitted infection, there is a great deal of shame and stigma associated with contracting the virus (Waller, et. al. 2007). HPV is a disease of disparities in that ethnic and sexual minorities are disproportionately affected. Since the HPV vaccine is most effective at both a younger age, and before the first sexual experience, it is important to protect the future sexual health of individuals. The debate is still ongoing in many states about whether the HPV vaccine should be a part of required school vaccinations for those entering the sixth grade. Many moral conservatives fear that forced vaccination infringes on parental rights and encourages sexual promiscuity before marriage. Abstinence-only messages being taught in schools has only served to amplify a sex-negative ideology in American culture. It is important for health care professionals to be aware of the social perspective of HPV and address these concerns, especially with their at risk patients. By addressing disparities, parent and provider views of vaccination, and sexual stigmas, vaccine uptake in all adolescents will be improved. Implementing a vaccine mandate for school entry will ensure that those at most risk of being affected will be reached.

http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/auchs/2012/panelc2/1