Event Title

Medicines that Kill

Location

Harkins 332, Providence College

Event Website

http://www.providence.edu/hpm/Pages/Conference.aspx

Start Date

31-3-2012 2:30 PM

End Date

31-3-2012 4:00 PM

Description

The prevalence of counterfeit drugs on the African continent has been increasing at an alarming rate. “Medicines that Kill” is a research paper that attempts to analyze the factors that make African countries particularly susceptible to this global threat. Nigeria, a country that has had some of the highest rates of counterfeit drugs in the world, is the main case study for this paper. Its efforts to combat the issue are compared and contrasted with those of Tanzania and Kenya in an attempt to understand what aspects of the issue are unique to Africa and the methods that have been successful in combating the issue. To provide further insight on the impact that drug counterfeiting has had on African public healthcare systems, their struggles to overcome this issue will be discussed. Particular attention is paid to the successful efforts of Dora Akunyili, the head of the Nigerian Drug and Food Agency, in reducing drug counterfeiting in Nigeria. The role of mobile phones in helping combat this issue is also examined. The efforts of African leaders and legislators, who have come together, to form continent wide legislation to persecute drug counterfeiters is included. Finally, based on these efforts and the analysis of leading experts like Roger Bates, a Harvard professor on public health, whose research is used extensively in this paper, Dora Akunyili and the World Health Organization future predictions about counterfeit drugs and their effects on public healthcare systems in Africa are made.

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Mar 31st, 2:30 PM Mar 31st, 4:00 PM

Medicines that Kill

Harkins 332, Providence College

The prevalence of counterfeit drugs on the African continent has been increasing at an alarming rate. “Medicines that Kill” is a research paper that attempts to analyze the factors that make African countries particularly susceptible to this global threat. Nigeria, a country that has had some of the highest rates of counterfeit drugs in the world, is the main case study for this paper. Its efforts to combat the issue are compared and contrasted with those of Tanzania and Kenya in an attempt to understand what aspects of the issue are unique to Africa and the methods that have been successful in combating the issue. To provide further insight on the impact that drug counterfeiting has had on African public healthcare systems, their struggles to overcome this issue will be discussed. Particular attention is paid to the successful efforts of Dora Akunyili, the head of the Nigerian Drug and Food Agency, in reducing drug counterfeiting in Nigeria. The role of mobile phones in helping combat this issue is also examined. The efforts of African leaders and legislators, who have come together, to form continent wide legislation to persecute drug counterfeiters is included. Finally, based on these efforts and the analysis of leading experts like Roger Bates, a Harvard professor on public health, whose research is used extensively in this paper, Dora Akunyili and the World Health Organization future predictions about counterfeit drugs and their effects on public healthcare systems in Africa are made.

http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/auchs/2012/panelc3/1