Presenter Information

Michael Tate, Providence College

Location

Harkins 332, Providence College

Event Website

http://www.providence.edu/hpm/Pages/Conference.aspx

Start Date

31-3-2012 2:30 PM

End Date

31-3-2012 4:00 PM

Description

More than 33 million people are living with HIV/AIDS around the globe with 68% of all cases occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. The global prevalence rate is shocking considering that the disease was relatively unknown just 30 years ago. After reviewing medical, health policy, and health statistical journals, I will argue in this paper that international aid to nations struggling with AIDS needs to be redirected and refocused on supplying antiretroviral therapy to afflicted nations because ARV has been proven to be effective in managing the disease in countries that can afford the costs of treatment. International aid to countries that are ravished by the epidemic, and the United States is one of the top contributors to such efforts with its “President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). The U.S. has realized the potential economic benefits of helping out such as becoming primary trade partners with the nations who have plenty of valuable natural resources despite their AIDS issues. In the U.S.’s efforts to combat terrorism, the nation has an interest in “stabilizing” certain countries, which are typically in Africa, so that they can resist potential terrorist threats or military coups. PEPFAR’s goal in fighting AIDS is part of the stabilization effort on the continent of Africa.

Fortunately, major pharmaceutical companies have discovered compounds that are effective in attacking the HIV virus, and this has led to the production of “antiretroviral” drugs. Anti-retroviral therapy has proven to be a useful tool used by those suffering from HIV/AIDS to manage their disease better and obtain a higher quality life. Such medications are widely available in wealthy nations, but poor countries that have the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence have a harder time affording such therapy or managing the drug supplies. Potential solutions to this problem include selling antiretroviral drugs at a lower cost to developing nations or using generic versions of such drugs.

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Mar 31st, 2:30 PM Mar 31st, 4:00 PM

Facing an Epidemic: An Analysis of HIV/AIDS, Antiretroviral Drug, and International Response to the AIDS Pandemic

Harkins 332, Providence College

More than 33 million people are living with HIV/AIDS around the globe with 68% of all cases occurring in sub-Saharan Africa. The global prevalence rate is shocking considering that the disease was relatively unknown just 30 years ago. After reviewing medical, health policy, and health statistical journals, I will argue in this paper that international aid to nations struggling with AIDS needs to be redirected and refocused on supplying antiretroviral therapy to afflicted nations because ARV has been proven to be effective in managing the disease in countries that can afford the costs of treatment. International aid to countries that are ravished by the epidemic, and the United States is one of the top contributors to such efforts with its “President’s Emergency Plan For AIDS Relief (PEPFAR). The U.S. has realized the potential economic benefits of helping out such as becoming primary trade partners with the nations who have plenty of valuable natural resources despite their AIDS issues. In the U.S.’s efforts to combat terrorism, the nation has an interest in “stabilizing” certain countries, which are typically in Africa, so that they can resist potential terrorist threats or military coups. PEPFAR’s goal in fighting AIDS is part of the stabilization effort on the continent of Africa.

Fortunately, major pharmaceutical companies have discovered compounds that are effective in attacking the HIV virus, and this has led to the production of “antiretroviral” drugs. Anti-retroviral therapy has proven to be a useful tool used by those suffering from HIV/AIDS to manage their disease better and obtain a higher quality life. Such medications are widely available in wealthy nations, but poor countries that have the highest HIV/AIDS prevalence have a harder time affording such therapy or managing the drug supplies. Potential solutions to this problem include selling antiretroviral drugs at a lower cost to developing nations or using generic versions of such drugs.

http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/auchs/2012/panelc3/3