Social and Behavioral Determinants of Health

Presenter Information

Haley Dumke, Connecticut College

Location

Harkins 300

Event Website

http://www.providence.edu/hpm/Pages/Conference.aspx

Start Date

23-3-2013 9:30 AM

End Date

23-3-2013 10:45 AM

Description

The intent of this study was to explore the effect of pre-existing illnesses on acute respiratory infections, focusing on HIV and malnutrition as infection development risk factors in South African children. It investigates the economic burden imposed by these infections and analyzes how the country’s current socio-economic situation plays a major part in propagating infection development. Pneumonia and RSV were individually examined for their current role in the disease burden and potential methods for reducing incidence of pediatric respiratory infections were evaluated based on effectiveness and affordability for the country of South Africa. Data for this paper was compiled mainly from secondary sources, with a small number of informed consent, formal interviews with experts in this field. Information from current global, and South African, respiratory infection studies was synthesized with the opinions of experts to form a complete analysis. The study found that because pediatric HIV and malnutrition cause deterioration of the immune system, this results in higher incidence of acute respiratory infection developments and increased risk of mortality. The findings showed that the large burden of respiratory illness in South Africa could be helped through the use of Vitamin A and Zinc supplements, immunizations, exclusive breastfeeding, and increasing nutrition to effectively reduce the burden of disease.

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Mar 23rd, 9:30 AM Mar 23rd, 10:45 AM

The Effects of Pre-existing Illnesses on Pediatric Acute Respiratory Infections in South Africa

Harkins 300

The intent of this study was to explore the effect of pre-existing illnesses on acute respiratory infections, focusing on HIV and malnutrition as infection development risk factors in South African children. It investigates the economic burden imposed by these infections and analyzes how the country’s current socio-economic situation plays a major part in propagating infection development. Pneumonia and RSV were individually examined for their current role in the disease burden and potential methods for reducing incidence of pediatric respiratory infections were evaluated based on effectiveness and affordability for the country of South Africa. Data for this paper was compiled mainly from secondary sources, with a small number of informed consent, formal interviews with experts in this field. Information from current global, and South African, respiratory infection studies was synthesized with the opinions of experts to form a complete analysis. The study found that because pediatric HIV and malnutrition cause deterioration of the immune system, this results in higher incidence of acute respiratory infection developments and increased risk of mortality. The findings showed that the large burden of respiratory illness in South Africa could be helped through the use of Vitamin A and Zinc supplements, immunizations, exclusive breastfeeding, and increasing nutrition to effectively reduce the burden of disease.

http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/auchs/2013/panela1/1