Stigma and Health Disparities

Presenter Information

Genevieve Ilg, Providence College

Location

Harkins 301

Event Website

http://www.providence.edu/hpm/Pages/Conference.aspx

Start Date

23-3-2013 1:45 PM

End Date

23-3-2013 3:00 PM

Description

“Listen Carefully:” A Study of Ageist Stereotypes and Undergraduates’ Desire to Work with Elders identifies and assesses how prior experience with elders and ageist stereotypes informs the degree to which undergraduates are inclined (or disinclined) to consider geriatrics as a potential career. Current literature indicates a lack of interest among social workers and other allied-health professionals in working with this demographic. Here, the “generation gap” not only pertains to the differences between younger people and their elders, but to the gap between the aging population’s increasing demand of need and how many individuals plan to serve the elderly. For this study, participants were required to prioritize a set of 27 statements in order from least to most significant in influencing their desire to work with elders (Q methodology). A factor analysis of the data generated two groups of participants. Group 1 was significantly (p <.01) more willing to work with elders, which was associated with their rejection of negative stereotypes and their indication of having prior experience working with elders. Group 2 was significantly less willing to work with the elders (p < .01), put significantly (p < .05) more emphasis on deficits of old age, and reported not having as much experience working with the elderly. The data suggest that exposure to actual work with elders and debunking false, negative stereotypes about the elderly are key in attracting professionals to work in geriatrics. Funding for incentive and awareness programs should be provided to encourage more people to work in geriatrics.

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Mar 23rd, 1:45 PM Mar 23rd, 3:00 PM

“Listen Carefully:” A Study of Ageist Stereotypes and Undergraduates’ Desire to Work with Elders

Harkins 301

“Listen Carefully:” A Study of Ageist Stereotypes and Undergraduates’ Desire to Work with Elders identifies and assesses how prior experience with elders and ageist stereotypes informs the degree to which undergraduates are inclined (or disinclined) to consider geriatrics as a potential career. Current literature indicates a lack of interest among social workers and other allied-health professionals in working with this demographic. Here, the “generation gap” not only pertains to the differences between younger people and their elders, but to the gap between the aging population’s increasing demand of need and how many individuals plan to serve the elderly. For this study, participants were required to prioritize a set of 27 statements in order from least to most significant in influencing their desire to work with elders (Q methodology). A factor analysis of the data generated two groups of participants. Group 1 was significantly (p <.01) more willing to work with elders, which was associated with their rejection of negative stereotypes and their indication of having prior experience working with elders. Group 2 was significantly less willing to work with the elders (p < .01), put significantly (p < .05) more emphasis on deficits of old age, and reported not having as much experience working with the elderly. The data suggest that exposure to actual work with elders and debunking false, negative stereotypes about the elderly are key in attracting professionals to work in geriatrics. Funding for incentive and awareness programs should be provided to encourage more people to work in geriatrics.

http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/auchs/2013/panelc2/2