The politics of honor: Character, slavery, and the political development of Abraham Lincoln, 1809--1854

John J Coelho, Providence College

Abstract

Lincoln's community, the Upland Southern community, was an extremely precarious, highly masculine social structure, and its unwritten rules of conduct, in combination with a fluid class arrangement, placed great pressure on Illinois' citizens. In this hothouse of social and state politics, a man's motives and conduct came under constant scrutiny. Only those select few deemed worthy by the people were able to attain their highest award, their honor, and were provided with an opportunity to run for political office. The author utilizes the work of Ryan Dearinger and Nicole Etcheson, along with the great wealth of oral histories made commercially available in the last ten years, to examine the role Upland Southern honor played in the political and personal development of Abraham Lincoln. Special attention is paid to how Upland Southern honor influenced Lincoln's thoughts and decisions upon the great issue of his day, that of slavery. ^

Subject Area

Biography|History, United States

Recommended Citation

Coelho, John J, "The politics of honor: Character, slavery, and the political development of Abraham Lincoln, 1809--1854" (2006). ETD Collection for Providence College. AAI1438456.
http://digitalcommons.providence.edu/dissertations/AAI1438456

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