Description

This thesis paper provides an evaluation of international criminal tribunals and their ability to incite sustainable peace in ethnically conflicted regions of the world. This research focuses particularly on the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and the role it has played in reconciling ethnic tensions in the Balkans. First, an extensive review of the literature concerning international jurisdiction provides background information on the two opposing views of international relations: realism and legalism. Both perspectives of international relations have significant implications for the effectiveness of this UN Tribunal and whether or not such supra-national institutions are ultimately effective. The most significant element of research, however, was done in conjunction with the ICTY Outreach Programme office in The Hague, Netherlands, and with the organization Human Rights Watch. After an extensive evaluation of the Tribunal’s development over the last decade, and most importantly, the activities of the ICTY Outreach Programme in the states which formerly comprised Yugoslavia, the conclusion is reached that the ICTY provides an effective model for other international criminal tribunals. Recommendations for international policy and further research are also provided.

Publisher

Providence College

Date

5-8-2009

Type

Article

Format

Text

PDF

Language

English

Comments

A project based on independent investigation, submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies.

This paper was presented at the Second Annual Student Research Symposium, April 4, 2009, sponsored by the Global Studies Program at Providence College . The event provides recognition for excellent student scholarship in the field of Global Studies.