Description

The nutrition transition is a rapidly developing global problem. The disparity between the rates of global obesity and malnutrition is diminishing. Westernization and industrialization are serious factors contributing to the global food and dietary epidemic. As a result, food cultures are threatened by dietary changes inflicted by Westernization. Moreover, rates of diet related non-communicable diseases are on the rise as never seen before. This study examines the problem of the nutrition transition through the context of the prevalence of food cultures, case studies, culinary recipes, dietary habits, and cultural transitions. Supporting this research is a dietary survey of study abroad and international students at Providence College. Additionally, dietary interviews with the refugees of the International Institute of Rhode Island illustrate the prevalence of the nutrition transition if present. This dissertation advocates that loss of food cultures is predisposed to the nutrition transition. Cultural dietary wisdom is affirmed to be the guide to good health and nutrition.

Publisher

Providence College

Date

4-15-2009

Type

Article

Format

Text

PDF

Language

English

Comments

A project based on independent investigation, submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Global Studies.

oneil_a_culinary_table.doc (40 kB)
Table of 'Ancient Food Cultures: Past and Present'