Subject Area

Library science

Description

Providing a collaborative learning space with appropriate services and resources for our undergraduate clientele, but with just two physical rooms, a limited budget and the commons concept to guide our decisions, was challenging. The context and mission of the Library within the University were important considerations and the theoretical and practical drivers for change as they relate to our goals and aims will be examined. Creativity in the use of space and clear, focused project management were also key factors in creating a successful Commons environment. The results of the changes made, and an assessment and evaluation of the project will be presented.

Date

June 2007

Type

Article

Format

Application

.ppt

Language

English

Rights

The author(s) permits users to copy, distribute, display, and perform this work under the following conditions: (1) the original author(s) must be given proper attribution; (2) this work may not be used for commercial purposes; (3) the users may not alter, transform, or build upon this work; (4) users must make the license terms of this work clearly known for any reuse or distribution of this work. Upon request, as holder of this work’s copyright, the author(s) may waive any or all of these conditions.

Comments

This presentation was given at the NorthEast Computing Program (NERCOMP) Event "Uncommon Commons" held Tuesday, June 5, 2007, at the Four Points Sheraton Hotel and Conference Center, Norwood, MA. Event organizer/hosts: Beatrice Pulliam, Providence College, and Lisa Wiecki, Brandeis University.

Workshop introduction: "The term Information or Learning Commons has been used to describe a wave of integrated service environments cropping up in libraries around the globe. These collaborative learning spaces are a place where information seekers have ready access to services and resources. Each institution seems to have its own special interpretation or spin on what a "commons" is or does. For some libraries the ideas and concepts surrounding the "commons" translate into something unique, unusual… uncommon. In this session we will showcase examples of creative use of existing space, staff, and resources in the implementation of a "commons" environment. Models of smaller, informal, inexpensive common spaces in libraries and other information service environments will also be highlighted."

For more information on this event and presenters visit: www.nercomp.org/events/event_single.aspx?id=659

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