Subject Area

Sociology

Description

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to over 60% of the world’s AIDS cases; thus, HIV prevention and treatment is a pressing global issue that needs to be addressed with governmental assistance, medication, education, and overall community support. This research paper examines and compares the success of HIV/AIDS treatment, education, and prevention programs in sub-Saharan Africa in order to determine which type of program is the most effective. The three program types that are examined are large-scale governmental policies and organizations, local community run grassroots organizations, and programs that combine grassroots initiatives with umbrella organization assistance. The general consensus of the reviewed literature implies that combination programs will be most effective due to their relative financial stability (as opposed to grassroots programs) and consistent interaction and involvement with the community (unlike large-scale organizations). This study gathered data through a qualitative survey distributed to key stakeholders of organizations in sub-Saharan Africa that represent the three types listed above. Eight programs were contacted, but due to international communication barriers and limitations on releasing private program information, only one key stakeholder completed the survey, while an additional two followed up with other information. Still, through careful examination of these particular programs it was determined that, contrary to the literature, the grassroots program was most effective in terms of education, treatment, and prevention.

Publisher

Providence College

Date

5-1-2009

Type

Article

Format

Text

.pdf

Language

English

Comments

A project based on independent investigation, submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Social Work. Originally written for the Theory Practice Seminar, Providence College, 2009.

Included in

Social Work Commons

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