Description

Children begin to build self-esteem in early childhood based on social and emotional development. Previous research has shown that children inhabiting homes where the biological, adoptive, or step father are present have shown to exhibit higher levels of self esteem and social functioning. However, further information regarding the positive male influence, lesbian parenting, or the absence of “paternal absence” stigmas have show to contradict the previous research. This study investigated the self-esteem of economically disadvantaged children using results from the Devereux Early Childhood Assessment as it relates to the levels of father involvement. 115 children ages 3-5 involved in a governmentally subsidized pre-school and case management program were studied using a composite DECA score as rated by both parents and pre-school providers. Family case managers and student files were used to yield demographic data and data regarding paternal presence and involvement. To determine possible relationship, this information was synthesized into charts and analyzed using non-parametric correlations (Mann Whitney Test and Spearman’s r). The findings revealed no significance between the levels of paternal involvement and participant’s self-esteem. The findings of this work are intended to inform the social work profession of the benefits of further inclusion of fathers in social service interventions and promote social policy to advocate for the rights of fathers in the human services field.

Publisher

Providence College

Date

Spring 2010

Type

Article

Format

Text

pdf

Language

English



Included in

Social Work Commons

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