Description

Chronic illnesses like cancer, sickle cell anemia, HIV, hemophilia, and metabolic disorders are on the rise. Chronic illness can be defined as an ongoing health condition that requires specialized treatments and may cause limitations in functions, activities or social roles. There are multiple phases that individuals with chronic illness progress through while learning to cope with their condition. Children with chronic illness are likely to spend a great deal of time in doctor’s offices and in the hospital. This study hypothesized that there is limited support for and understanding of the needs of children with chronic illness once they leave intensive inpatient hospital settings and reenter the school system. An additional hypothesis focused on the lack of communication between hospital and school providers to support the social, emotional, and physical needs of these children. Using a survey instrument, information was collected from public school social workers, psychologists, and school nurses and from hospital personnel, hospital outreach specialists, social workers, and psychologists. Results of the questionnaire had varied results, but supported the hypothesis that there is a lack of communication between hospitals and schools regarding children with chronic illnesses. Further research should be done to explore the prevalence and needs of children with chronic conditions.

Publisher

Providence College

Date

Spring 2010

Type

Article

Format

Text

pdf

Language

English

Included in

Social Work Commons

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