Description

This study addressed the prevalence of burnout and coping strategies within a sample of forty child welfare direct service workers. Although social work can be an extremely gratifying profession, the difficulties inherent in the social work field cause added stress to the worker. Surveys were distributed and measured participants’ levels of burnout in three areas to include: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment. Results revealed a group of dedicated workers that are under stress due to the urgency of their work. Workers described a wide array of positive and negative coping methods as means to address work related stress. Practice, policy, and research implications were addressed.

Publisher

Providence College

Date

Spring 2011

Type

Article

Format

Text

.pdf

Language

English

Included in

Social Work Commons

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