Subject Area

Theology

Description

This thesis examines the particular contributions of Basil of Caesarea on the development of tradition by evaluating his claim that he is not innovating. Basil’s creativity, as examined by Andrew Radde-Gallwitz, allows him to develop more explicitly the reception of customs and oral teachings as apostolic tradition. The thesis uses modern scholarship on both the Council of Nicaea and Basil to examine Basil’s defense of “written and unwritten traditions” in his On the Holy Spirit. Particular attention is given to the use of liturgy and the teachings of the fathers by Basil in his defense of his own doxology. Basil's use of this material, along with his reasoned defense of it, helps a more explicit teaching on apostolic tradition to develop. This thesis then turns to the scholarship of Yves Congar and his work Tradition and Traditions which outlines the historical development and theological implications of Tradition. This thesis compares the later, developed Roman Catholic doctrine of tradition as taught by Congar to the earlier defense of apostolic traditions given by Basil. The conclusion recognizes both Basil’s sincerity in refuting the charge of innovation and his creativity in expression that is an early point in the development of the doctrine of tradition that leads to Congar’s teaching on Tradition.

Publisher

Providence College

Date

Summer 2020

Type

Thesis

Format

Text

.pdf (text searchable)

Language

English

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